Interesting People Reading Interesting Things #4
11.00

Sunday, November 5th, 2017

10:30am-12:00pm

75 Farrand Park, Highland Park

        stor·y time

noun: storytime
  1. a regular time at which a story is read aloud.
  2. a time when a story is told to a group of assembled people.
    1. Storytime precedes bedtime for some children.
    2. Many public libraries offer storytime on a regular schedule.

Storytime for adults is just that- It’s an hour and a half on a weekend morning to listen as an interesting person reads an interesting thing. After the reader finishes reading there’ll be a discussion and a bit of time for questions with the reader. The reader is announced but their choice of book, newspaper, poems, script, or anything else is kept secret until storytime.

A few lite snacks, mimosas and bloody mary’s will be served at no cost to guests.

Interesting Things Read by Interesting People is a monthly event at The Detroit History Club. For the second installment, our reader is John Sauve'.

John Sauvé, born in 1963 in Detroit, is an American artist and arts educator. His medium is sculpture and printmaking and has achieved national and international recognition. He was awarded a grant from the Marc Ecco Foundation for his work Man in the City, the first public sculpture exhibit installed on the Highline in New York City. John Sauvé studied art history at Michigan State University. After finishing his studies, he spent a year traveling through Europe continuing his education in art history. He then returned to Detroit to work for the Michigan Commission on Art in Public Places where he oversaw the installation of public art for the Percent for the Art Program. He concluded his studies with a degree in Arts Administration at Michigan State University.

John Sauvé references philosophy, literature, and history by approaching the human figure with an idealized representation. Borrowing from Heidegger’s concept of “Dasein”, Jung’s interest in the shadow and the Faustian Legend, Sauvé’s sculpture is as much about the figure as the shadow it cast. This relationship highlights his interest in the question of being and the covenant the individual will make to exist. Sauvé challenges the viewer by presenting the figure in public spaces utilizing the environment as a way to question what it means to existence and relationship between the individual and the collective.
John Sauvé is currently installing the Man in the City project in the City of Detroit and the City of Windsor. The Man in the City is an international sculpture project comprised of 60 sculptures located on the rooftops of prominent buildings throughout the City of Detroit and Windsor. The Man in the City project creates a metaphor for life that transforms the skyline and encourages people to look around. In the discovery process one becomes aware of their sense of place within the City. John Sauvé’s work has been exhibited in such high---profile venues as the Venice Biennale, Governor’s Island, the International Sculpture Exhibition in Chicago, Krasl Sculpture Biennale, The Highline, Art Chicago, Elon University Sculpture, Knoxville Sculpture, Birmingham Cityscapes, Delta College, The Ella Sharpe Museum, The Krasl Museum, Cliff Dwellers Chicago, EXPO Chicago, The Brighton Biennial and Millikan Park. John Sauvé’s sculptures have been or are currently displayed innumerous public spaces in the US, as well as in England, Canada, Germany, Japan, and Italy.

Because The Detroit History Club operates as a members-only club, out of private homes, hidden spaces, and secret locations, you’ll need to join before being able to buy tickets to events.  At checkout you’ll be asked if you are already a member; if not, select “New Member.” Membership to The Detroit History Club is five dollars per calendar year.  Each person attending an event must have a membership of their own.  Membership cards may be picked up at the first event you attend as a new member, and new cards are issued at the first event you attend each year.  Parking is on-street and at your own risk (we’ve never had an issue, but the lawyer insists we have the disclaimer).

Detroit History Club events are for persons twenty-one years old and up.  We drink, we swear, we talk about things, and we’d love for you to join us.  Whether you come as a couple, a group, or a singleton, our events are designed to encourage you to make new friends, explore ideas, and learn- all while eating, drinking, dancing, and generally behaving in a way that makes us proud to call ourselves Detroiters. We would like to remind you that this event is taking place in a private home; your respect is greatly appreciated

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Veterans Day on the Homefront; a historic behind the scenes tour of The Willow Run Factory.
89.50

Saturday, November 11th, 2017
7:00pm - 11:00pm
Yankee Air Museum - 47884 D. Street, Belleville MI 48111

On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918 an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, was declared between the Allied nations and Germany in the First World War, the “The Great War.” The following year, President Woodrow Wilson commemorated Armistice Day and in 1938 it became a federal holiday in the United States. After World War II, Armistice Day was rebranded as Veterans Day, a holiday dedicated to honoring American veterans of all wars. This year we are thrilled to invite you to join The Detroit History Club for a Veterans Day adventure on the hallowed, historic grounds of Willow Run.

“No battle was ever fought on this ground, but it helped win the war.”

Ford’s unimaginable factory, Willow Run, was hewn from the Ypsilanti farmland to become a symbol for both failure and success in American manufacturing, industrial hubris, mechanical advancement and sheer force of will. This factory--this dream--conceived in a California hotel, would be the single largest contributor to the Arsenal of Democracy.  It rose, where apple orchards once stood, to produce an entire B17 Liberator Bomber in an hour by 1945. A factory so powerful Hitler claimed it couldn’t exist.

At the exclusive invitation of the Yankee Air Museum, step behind the locked gates, past the construction equipment, and around the “No Access” signs into the hanger before it becomes The National Museum of Aviation & Technology. Under the sentinel eyes of the beautifully preserved historic aircraft, this cocktail attire evening will begin in the Yankee Air Museum. There you will sip cocktails and enjoy an exquisite strolling dinner as the Executive Director, Mr. Kevin Walsh, takes rotating, intimate groups into the archive rooms of the museum's extensive collection. The Detroit History Club’s founder, Bailey Sisoy Isgro, will present on some of her favorite moments in the factory's history and tell the tale of a president's visit, a son's success, and the grandsons who carried on in their father's footsteps. Following dinner and private access to the closed museum, you’ll drive yourself a half mile down private roads to the darkened hanger where you will stand in the shadow of the (one of the largest aircraft hangar doors in America, on the very floors, once tread by Edsel Ford, “Cast Iron” Charlie Sorenson, President and Mrs. Roosevelt, Frances Perkins, and thousands of Women War Workers who would come to be known as Rosies. Through that immense door rolled over half of all Liberator bombers built for Allied forces during World War Two and, out its mighty expanse, aviation icon, Charles Lindbergh, captained test flights.  You’ll learn the stories that earned Detroit its wartime reputation, feel the weight of the ladder into a Liberator as you climb inside, enter the pressure preserved rooms, and see, first-hand, some of the museum's most prized pieces. We promise historic aircraft, uniforms, war workers, military history, and of course the once-in-a-lifetime chance to breathe in the history of the Willow Run factory before it becomes the National Museum of Aviation & Technology.


As part of our evening, we’d like to include photos of members of The Detroit History Club (and their parents, grandparents, or other family members) that serve or served in the military. Please send us a photograph along with your name, rank, branch, and years of service to Detroithistorytours@gmail.com.  We promise we won’t embarrass you in any way or do anything unseemly with your photo. (If you’re sending a photo of a family member please include your name and relation to the service member along with their rank, branch, and dates of service, if known).  We are looking for World War Two homefront workers, too. Same thing, send a photo with your name and where you worked. If it's a family member please included the relationship.

This event is 21 years old and older. Because The Detroit History Club operates as a members-only club, out of private homes, hidden spaces, and secret locations, you’ll need to join before being able to buy tickets to events.  At checkout you’ll be asked if you are already a member; if not, select “New Member.” Membership to The Detroit History Club is five dollars per calendar year. You can buy your membership under the membership tab on this website.  Each person attending an event must have a membership of their own.  Membership cards may be picked up at the first event you attend as a new member, and new cards are issued at the first event you attend each year.

Dinner Menu

Pastrami Style Smoked Salmon - on crostini with capers, onions, and sour cream
Cowboy Steak Crostini - grilled steak, sliced & topped with glazed onions & blue cheese
Skewered Tropical Shrimp - marinated and grilled skewered with fresh mango and cilantro
Fresh Mozzarella on Bruschetta - with tomato and black olive relish
Cashew Chicken Profiterole - with honey Dijon dressing

Quinoa & Roasted Beet Salad
with cucumber, aged feta, green onions and balsamic dressing

House Salad- assorted spring mix greens, tossed with candied pecan pieces, sun-dried cranberries and organic tri-colored carrot threads with a house made cranberry vinaigrette

Italian Chopped Salad-Crisp romaine lettuce chopped and blended with Asiago cheese, herb croutons, peppers, onions, and tossed with a creamy parmesan dressing

Domestic Cheese Display
Cheddar, Swiss, Pepperjack, cut and served with assorted cracker display 

Creamy Spinach and Artichoke Dip
Roast Red Pepper Hummus
Antipasto Display Assorted marinated olives, beets, artichoke hearts displayed with Italian cured meats
Chilled Gulf Shrimp Traditional shrimp cocktail platter, served with cocktail chile sauce
Chipotle BBQ Steak - sirloin grilled with a zesty barbecue glaze
Smoked Salmon Cakes - bite-sized moist salmon with lemon aioli
Spinach and Cheese in Filo - braized spinach and onions with parmesan

Chipotle BBQ Steak
Smoked Salmon Cakes
Spinach and Cheese Pie in Filo

Open Bar serving
Coffee, soda, Stroh's beer, Willow Run signature cocktail, red and white wine
 

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Interesting People Reading Interesting Things #5
20.00

Sunday, November 19th, 2017

10:30am-12:00pm

75 Farrand Park, Highland Park

        stor·y time

noun: storytime
  1. a regular time at which a story is read aloud.
  2. a time when a story is told to a group of assembled people.
    1. Storytime precedes bedtime for some children.
    2. Many public libraries offer storytime on a regular schedule.

Storytime for adults is just that- It’s an hour and a half on a weekend morning to listen as an interesting person reads an interesting thing. After the reader finishes reading there’ll be a discussion and a bit of time for questions with the reader. The reader is announced but their choice of book, newspaper, poems, script, or anything else is kept secret until storytime.

*You may have noticed this installment of I.P.R.I.T.'s is slighty more expensie than others. Thats because Mythy has agreed to make everyone breakfast!*

Interesting Things Read by Interesting People is a monthly event at The Detroit History Club. For the fifth installment, our reader is MyThy Huynh, known to her followers as @mightyinthemitten.

Working full time as an ER nurse at the largest Level 1 Trauma Center in the county at Beaumont Royal Oak requires an outlet. For MyThy, pronounced “Mighty”, it’s often cooking, baking and exploring new food cultures and cuisine. What first started as baking for pleasure for her coworkers as a way to boost morale when shifts were chaotic, became a passion for experimenting with unique flavors. These days when MyThy isn’t working, she’s making Hokkaido Milk Bread with Chinese-Vietnamese flavors with an American touch as an homage to her Asian-American upbringing. From food and posting what she makes on Instagram as @MightyintheMitten, MyThy fell in love with food photography and food styling. Nurturing health at home and at work truly has come full circle for her.


Because The Detroit History Club operates as a members-only club, out of private homes, hidden spaces, and secret locations, you’ll need to join before being able to buy tickets to events.  At checkout you’ll be asked if you are already a member; if not, select “New Member.” Membership to The Detroit History Club is five dollars per calendar year.  Each person attending an event must have a membership of their own.  Membership cards may be picked up at the first event you attend as a new member, and new cards are issued at the first event you attend each year.  Parking is on-street and at your own risk (we’ve never had an issue, but the lawyer insists we have the disclaimer).

Detroit History Club events are for persons twenty-one years old and up.  We drink, we swear, we talk about things, and we’d love for you to join us.  Whether you come as a couple, a group, or a singleton, our events are designed to encourage you to make new friends, explore ideas, and learn- all while eating, drinking, dancing, and generally behaving in a way that makes us proud to call ourselves Detroiters. We would like to remind you that this event is taking place in a private home; your respect is greatly appreciated

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The Repeal Ball
148.00

Saturday, December 2nd, 2017

7:00 to 11:30 pm

A party that hasn't been seen in 85 years...Dark rooms drenched in flowers, silk ball gowns, tailored tuxedos, and illegal booze. Hallways dripping in mysterious women and criminal miscreants. Excitement fueled by Federal agents, the Cold Water Army, sultry dancing, dirty politicians and a red hot band. Balconies overflowing with violent outbreaks or stolen kisses, and, bars pouring out the lifeblood of Detroit crime and the instantly re-legalized fiscal windfall of distilling. Grab a glass of ill gotten champagne, and join The Detroit History Club for The Repeal Ball.

On December 5th, 1933, thirteen long years of American prohibition came to an end. Liquor was once again legal and Detroiters celebrated in style. The Membership of the Detroit Yacht Club danced into the early morning hours, along the shore of the river which had seen so much of prohibitions crime. We are ready to do it again- December 2nd, 2017, 85 years after it happened in the same ballroom that hosted the original party to welcome back parties. Together we will celebrate the repeal of the Volstead Act.

This evening is designed to be a fully immersive experience, a ghost of a legendary night, the reincarnation of a singular memory. Rich in fantasy, history, and Detroit. Guests are required to dress for the occasion in full 1930’s glamor. Tuxedo or dark suit and evening or cocktail dress. Perhaps slip a carnation in his lapel or a silk ribbon in her hair. Draw on straight nylon seams with a charcoal eyeliner all the way up her calves and slip a hidden flask into his vest pocket. Let the thrift store, vintage shops, and grandparent’s closet raiding begin.

The sounds of a full jazz band will greet you as you glide up the 1928 grand staircase to the ballroom of the Detroit Yacht Club. Shimmy out onto the dance floor to the smoky melodies and forgotten songs of Detroit's famed jazz age as sixteen person band plays. Grab a (candy) cigar off the tray of a cigarette girl and watch the river from the private balconies. Have your fortune told or tea leaves read along the hallowed hall of Peacock Alley under ornate chandlers donated by Matilda Dodge and among the trophies of a century and a half of yacht racing. you'll be tempted to the delights of a spirit inspired strolling dinner and an inclusive prohibition themed bar.

Throughout the night clinking glasses will sound as political figures, anti drink crusaders, and even a few wild surprises stand to deliver their speeches, warnings, and toasts to the occasion of Repeal. Arrests will be made, conversions will be sought, and prayers for your immoral and sinful soul will be offered.

Surprises are in store. The drinks are on ice. The band is hot. And prohibition is once again ending in Detroit.

THE DYC EXECUTIVE CHEF HAS PREPARED A PROHIBITION THEMED STROLLING SUPPER MENU FOR YOUR ENJOYMENT:

-RUM MARINATED FRUIT SALAD WITH MINT AND BLOOD ORANGE

-FRESH SLICED FRUIT TRAYS WITH MICHIGAN MADE CHEESE AND CRUDITÉ

-BOURBON GLAZED PORK BELLY ON CORNBREAD

-GIN AND JUICE BRAISED DUCK ON BRIOCHE TOAST

-RUM GLAZED CHICKEN SATAY

-PARMESAN HOTHOUSE ASPARAGUS EN PHYLLO

-CHAMPAGNE AND STRAWBERRY CUPCAKES WITH WHITE CHOCOLATE BUTTERCREAM.

THE COMPLIMENTARY BAR WILL BE SERVING A VARIETY OF SODAS, BEERS, AND COCKTAILS THEMED TO THE EVENING.

Our friends at Teckla Vintage (9600 Joseph Campau St., Hamtramck) have extended a 10% discount to anyone shopping for The Repeal Ball. Simply show them your confirmation email at checkout.

(Dressing up and looking Prohibition divine doesn't have to be expensive or nerve wracking. Have fun with it. Try a great vintage shop or Goodwill to find a calf length dress. Pair your evening frock with a peacock feather in your hair or a vintage rhinestone brooch at the shoulder. Long strands of  (faux or real) pearls will make any dress instantly themed. For gents remember the DYC has a no hats for men policy. Instead brighten up your suit with a colorful pocket square and deep colored silk tie. Perhaps a tie tack or tie bar and boutonniere will be what makes you stand out. If you need help we are your humble servants and happy to answer questions by email.)

Because The Detroit History Club operates as a members-only club, out of private homes, hidden spaces, and secret locations, you’ll need to join before being able to buy tickets to events. This can be done under the Membership tab on this site. Memberships are NOT included in ticket prices. At checkout you’ll be asked if you are already a member; if not, select “New Member.” Membership to The Detroit History Club is five dollars per calendar year.  Each person attending an event must have a membership of their own.  Membership cards will be mailed USPS within two weeks of your order. There are no physical tickets for events, your name will be at a check-in list upon arrival.


Detroit History Club events are for persons twenty-one years old and up. We drink, we swear, we talk about things, and we’d love for you to join us. Whether you come as a couple, a group, or a singleton, our events are designed to encourage you to make new friends, explore ideas, and learn- all while eating, drinking, dancing, and generally behaving in a way that makes us proud to call ourselves Detroiters. We would like to remind you that this event is taking place in a private club; your respect is greatly appreciated.

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Detroit History Tours is thrilled to announce the opening of The Detroit History Club.

Although the club now offers a full calendar of events to our members we are always rolling out our award winning tours. 

Please consider joining us on one or several very soon.

 

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